When Langston Miller was 8, he’d fill pages with characters that looked like him and staple those pages together. He was already thinking about distributing his "books"; he wanted to see them in Barnes & Noble stores. His mother Victoria Scott-Miller took him to a local store in Raleigh, N.C., to see how many books they could find that represent the type of work her son was doing and that represent him as a little Black boy. They found five such books in two and a half hours. So Langston’s ambitions, and the need they exposed, inspired a family business. It started as a pop-up bookstore and, though the pandemic caused it to morph into an online business, it sells thoughtfully selected children’s books in which Black children are the main characters.

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